0

Portrait of a Dog

When I’m browsing the submissions on RedditGetsDrawn I try to look for photos with interesting lighting first and then photos of pets second. It seems that people are less critical of the likeness when you paint their pet. In contrast, a strong resemblance is wanted when you’re drawing a person. Take the Tom Brady courtroom sketch incident that occurred just yesterday, for example. The artist has been publicly shamed because their depiction wasn’t perfect. It made me a little grumpy knowing how hard it is to draw and capture a scene quickly and then seeing the hate the artist is receiving. Anyway, today I worked on a gouache painting of user jdmb3641’s dog.

FullSizeRender (9)

It took roughly two hours to complete this 2″ x 3.5″ puppy. It was even smaller than my last gouache painting. I’m starting to realize how hard it is to push the darks on gouache. I may need to invest in a black so I can mix it with other colors to get some solid darks.

Advertisements
0

The Trestle at Bedrock Gardens

A short ride from my apartment is the expansive and unique Bedrock Gardens. I met several artists from the NH Art Association there for a plein air session. For the first thirty minutes I walked around searching for a subject. There was just too much to see. To avoid becoming overwhelmed I finally just picked a subject and went with it.

FullSizeRender (8)

Trestle 5″ x 7″

This trestle was standing in the center of a long stretch of grass lined by two parallel rows of young trees. I imagine that in ten years time, once the trees have grown, the trestle will sit at the end of a beautiful, tall, and leafy alley.

There was a lot of information to squeeze into my tiny 5″ x 7″ canvas panel. For twenty minutes I wrestled with the perspective drawing until I got the trestle constrained. I knew if I didn’t contain it at the beginning that it would only get harder to work with.

I hit my rhythm early on with this painting and had it done by noon. Everything seemed to fall into place.

Trestle is for sale at $70. If you’d like to purchase this painting, please send me an email at thewritingmann@gmail.com.

0

Exploring Grays in Portraiture

Cooked some pasta for lunch, closed the kitchen windows to prevent the monsoon outside from coming in, and went back to working on RedditGetsDrawn portraits.

IMG_3301

Since anyone can submit to reddit, the quality of photos is usually a mixed back. After a little search I found a self-portrait by user Shmoonify that I liked.

IMG_3304I already use a simple palette, but for this painting I basically only used sap green, ultramarine blue, phthalo blue, and alizarin crimson. There was a little flame red and yellow ochre in there as well. The muted colors forced me to explore the possible ranges of grays in gouache.

I kept the size small for this one so I can later squeeze more portraits on to the same page. It’s 2 3/8″ x 4″.

2

By the Lake in Webster

This past weekend Sarah and I went to Webster, New Hampshire and stayed at a cabin for a night. Her aunt and uncle had rented a place on Lake Winnepocket and invited us up. It was a cute town on a nice, quiet lake. We got there around 8 on Friday night and spent a few hours playing games and sitting by the fire. In the morning I woke up to paint.

The sun wasn’t above the tree line yet and it was hard to find a subject that wasn’t entirely in shadow. I decided to paint the neighbor’s cabin, knowing the direction the sun was heading and hoping I would get some interesting lighting. I worked for around an hour and realized there was some heavy cloud cover above. Everyone was up at that point and getting ready to check out the local flea market. I set the painting aside and joined them.

Halfway through our excursion the sun burst through the clouds and the day took a positive turn. We got back to the cabin and I was able to work the painting to a point that I was satisfied. The lake was calling. It was time to go swimming.

Lake Winnepocket Lodge 8:1:15 (1)

Lake Winnepocket Lodge 9″ x 12″

The lack of sun was tricky, but even worse I was also dealing with an ungessoed, smooth panel as my painting surface. I’m used to the texture of canvas. My brushes did not act as they normally do. I wanted to try the panel because I sometimes don’t like the repetitive woven texture that shows through cotton canvas paintings. The panel painting only began acting as I’d hoped after I’d painted several layers and I was starting to paint over semi-dried paint. I also noticed that my brush was much more likely to pull paint away from the panel. The tackiness of semi-dried paint played a much larger role on panel. Perhaps I’ll try linen or some sort other sort of smooth, woven canvas.

Like this painting? Buy it for only $150! Email me at: thewritingmann@gmail.com!

0

Wagon Hill Farm

Grabbed an ice coffee this morning and met the NH Art Association at Wagon Hill Farm for a plein air session. The farm has a lot of land and I only saw a couple other artists before I set up. I imagine people were spread around the property.

WHF 7:29:15

House at Wagon Hill Farm  7″ x 5″

I painted from 9 am until noon and got this small painting done. Now that I’m back home I can see that the colors are a little washed out. The roofs could use a little more color and a little less white. I probably should’ve spent more time on location, but I was out in a field, hot, and being attacked by horseflies. But it was a good day nonetheless. I will have to go back and do paintings from other perspectives. It’s a great place.

If you like House at Wagon Hill Farm, it’s for sale for $70. Let’s talk about it. Send me an email: thewritingmann@gmail.com.

0

How to Paint a Wedding Gift

It’s Sunday, the clock has just passed 10pm, and my eyes are only open because I drank a little coffee with dinner. I’ve been trying to fill out this post since five, succumbing to short bouts of sleep along the way. The last four days have been long and tiring, but most importantly fun! Thursday night my girlfriend, Sarah, got out of work and we packed up our cars and drove down to her parents’ place in Massachusetts. Her sister was getting married! And she was co-maid of honor! She was meeting up with the bride and the other maid of honor for a relaxed night before the pre-wedding activities on Friday. I tagged along and gave the bride my wedding gift. More on that to come!

In the morning I got up and drove into Newburyport to do a 5″ x 7″ panel painting of historic downtown.

Newburyport 7:24:15

Across Merrimac Street 5″ x 7″

It was a cloudless and blue sky day and the sun was tucked low by the water. The town was mostly empty. As I readied myself to cross a street, I looked up and found my subject: a modern street light superimposed on a town of centuries-old brick. Like in Portsmouth, I was drawn to the contrast between old and new.

The early stages of the painting were irritating and I was upset with my slow progress. Then I realized I just needed to go empty the bladder. I was able to stay relaxed with that issue out of the way.

By noon some clouds had drifted in and I decided to include them. But with the clouds came rain and I was forced to pack up. Needing a change of pace, I met up with the groom and one of his groomsman for some burritos and coffee.

I’m selling Across Merrimac Street for $70. If you’re interested, email me at: thewritingmann@gmail.com!

It’s now Monday morning and I’m back at work on this post, having failed to finish before losing my fight with sleep. But I’m awake and ready today. On to the next painting!

I wanted to contribute a unique gift to the pile of wedding goodies and it was an easy jump in logic to realize I should do a painting. I weighed the idea for several months and I was still undecided when Sarah told me I should go ahead and do it. Next step was to figure out how to make it meaningful. I did not want to go too symbolic, incorporating items that are traditionally associated with marriage. Being the younger sister, Sarah has a lot of the bride’s old stuff, and I searched around for something to use. I settled on a patterned vase.

IMG_2977

I stuck the vase full of flowers and propped it atop an Ionic column prop my mother had. It’s the same column that can be seen in Hammer to Fall.

IMG_2981

My main concern for most of the painting was getting it all straight and centered. My old apartment was full of dips in the floor and walls that met at odd angles, so I never had a good frame of reference. The low light didn’t help either. I relied heavily on a small level placed on top of the canvas.

IMG_2984

Initially the painting was to have a traditionally dark background. It was far too moody. I wanted something lighthearted. Weddings are supposed to be happy and it needed to reflect that.

IMG_2997

There was no easy way to approach the patterns on the vase. I generally sketched them out with simplified color forms. Detail could be added later.

IMG_3057

While working on this painting I was beginning to realize how import outlines can be. My former teacher Numael Pulido always talked about the transition from background to object, but it wasn’t until recently that I began to truly experiment. You can see my interest in outlines with the flowers. I used them heavily and in some places perhaps too heavily. I always tried to go back and paint over areas that didn’t work. With a dry brush and thick paint I could lightly blur the transitions with the background.

IMG_3070The highlights on the vase were tricky. I avoided the use of pure white and matched them with the local color. Still, I was unable to grasp the shine I was looking for. I will have to practice painting other glossy items.

Vase_Final

The Wedding Vase 12″ x 16″

I had the painting basically done a couple weeks before the wedding. However, when the frame arrived I tinkered with the background. I did not want it to be a static blue.

I’m very happy with the way the painting turned out and the bride and groom both like it as well! After the wedding, Sarah and I wound up coming home with a floral centerpiece that’s absolutely gorgeous and might just be my next still life painting. In fact, I might go arrange it now.

2

Morning at Fort McClary

On Sunday I was encouraged by Lennie Mulaney to join the NH Art Association at their weekly plein air outings. I truly enjoyed the weekend’s competition and decided to tag along today. We met at Fort McClary in Maine around 8:30 am. Several signs said the park didn’t officially open until 10 am and we joked about getting arrested for trespassing as painters. After a quick look around, I set up my easel on the far south side of the fort.
McClary Setup

The large rectangular stones are leftovers from the building of the fort’s walls. After the end of the Civil War, construction was ceased because the McClary style of fort was deemed out of date. The stones were left haphazardly stacked in a few piles around the property.McClary Step 1

I wanted to include both the stones and the fort in my painting and as luck would have it I found a location that delivered a great composition. The stones in the foreground pointed straight back to the fort, drawing the viewer’s eyes in.McClary Step 2The focus of this piece was color. I wanted my darks to breathe a little more life than they have in the past. Once I’d blocked in all the major shapes I focused on color comparison. I brought a lot of warmth into my shadows with Cadmium Orange and broke out the Cerulean Blue to help provide some interesting cools. Since my last few paintings have been somewhat dark I thought these two colors could work to bring more light into my painting.

Fort McClary 7:22:15

Fort McClary 5″ x 7″

Towards the end of the painting a couple masses of clouds collided just behind the fortress, creating a rolling, chunky column that brought some variety to my background. I have had almost zero experience painting clouds from life, but I threw them in. It was a challenge. I swiftly brushed out the purple darks and by the time I was ready to put in the mid-tones the clouds were out of my composition. I watched them float away to the right, still painting, imagining them still behind the fort, still painting, developing the fluffy transitions from darks to lights, still painting, and I was turned sideways by the time I was done.

I’m extremely happy with the final piece. It’s another one of my tiny 5″ x 7″ canvas panels and I’m really starting to fall in love with that size. Lots of work can be done in a short amount of time, making them great for studies.

If you’re interested, you can purchase the original, unframed panel for $100. Send me an email at thewritingmann@gmail.com!