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A Succulent, A Bridge, A Sketchbook Too

August is here! And my birthday has gone by and I’m officially 28! Very crazy that I’m just a couple years away from 30. I can’t believe it!

I’ve been doing a decent amount of painting recently. In particular I have been working on a landscape plein air painting of a pond down the road from my house. I’m three sessions and about 7 hours in. I think two more sessions should finish it up.

I also completed a tiny 5×5″ still-life painting of one of Sarah’s succulents.

I was initially inspired by the blooming stalk. It appeared early in the summer and so I brought the plant inside and set it up on a box and did a quick sketch. Loose and gestural, it was a good start to the painting.

Before my second session, I scraped down the entire panel to smooth the surface and remove thick blobs of paint. This gave the painting a weathered look that I enjoy. At the conclusion of this painting I realized I was going to have to do some editing. The flowering stalk was growing too long and I could not fit it in the composition.

Succulent
5×5″

In the final session I shortened the stalk and reddened the flower buds in order to provide a complementary contrast to the green body of the succulent. Working so small gave me the opportunity to really rework the surface in ways that I often neglect to in larger paintings.

Last Friday I began the painting of the pond and then feeling the plein air bug, I went out on Saturday to do a coastal painting.

I wound up at Hilton Park in Dover, NH. I’d never been before but it provides a great view of the Little Bay Bridge into Newington. It was also decently busy for a park that doesn’t allow you to swim. There’s an incredibly fast current that races beneath the bridge. I watched several fishing boats motor beyond the bridge, cast their lines, and then be swept down current in ten minutes and have to do it all again.

With so much blue to work with, I began by toning my entire canvas in ultramarine. The bridge was my eventual focus, but I spent the first half of the session fiddling with every other part of the painting. With that out of the way, then I could focus my attention on the play of lights and darks along the bridge’s beams.

I’m glad I started the bridge by putting in the darks and greys. This established the back side of the bridge and allowed me to easily drop the lights in.

Little Bay Bridge
10×20″

Before I called it quits, I went around the entire painting and tried to harmonize everything. I also reworked the water, trying to replace white tinted colors with saturated colors.

Finally, I did a sketchbook tour of my latest Moleskin. Check it out!

In the video I talk about all the paintings and artwork I’ve drawn inspiration from during my museum visits. I thought it would be interesting to post the originals below and provide a little commentary on each one.

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Portrait of a Lady in Pink
William Merritt Chase

I have wanted to do a large seated portrait for a while. So I am often drawn to those paintings. This one had me contemplating how to deal with so much pink.

Arrangement in Flesh Color and Brown
James McNeill Whistler

Whistler’s Symphony in White is one of my favorite paintings of all time and when I saw this painting, I instantly drew the connections. Simple and strong.

Augustus Saint-Gaudens II
Anders Zorn

I know Zorn is one of the greats, I just haven’t seen too much of his work. However, this etching caught my attention with its ability to convey shadow and light.

Lake O’Hara
John Singer Sargent

It’s Sargent. I think I stared at the logs in the foreground for ten minutes. It’s such a perfect scene. I want to paint sunken logs now.

Bust of an African Woman
Charles Henri Joseph Cordier

The hair, neck, and cloth combo on this bust is amazing. Very regal.

Portrait of Fräulein Maria Wüsthoff
Wilhelm Trübner

I really do like mono-colored portraits. I was most intrigued by the translucency of the dress around the neck and collarbone.

Image result for self-portrait in tuxedo max beckmann
Self-Portrait in Tuxedo
Max Beckmann

Though he looks like a blockhead, I love the way Beckmann organized his facial structure. And the five o’ clock shadow comes off nicely through his use of greys and greens.

Negro Soldier
Robert Smullyan Sloan

I was really stuck on this egg tempera painting. It’s so delicate and precise. It reminded me of a Northern Renaissance portrait.

The Yellow Dancers
Gino Severini

Though I tend to like paintings that are more realistic, I do love the way how the impression of the dancers is conveyed through simple shapes.

The Hangover (Suzanne Valadon)
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

The woman in this painting has such an attitude that fits well with the title of the piece. Great facial expression.

Racehorses at Longchamp
Edgar Degas

I marveled at the horse legs in this painting. And then because it’s such a dark painting, I really appreciated the pops of color in the jockey jackets.

Women of Paris: The Circus Lover
James Jacques Joseph Tissot

The sheer amount of work that must’ve gone into this painting is incredible. There’s a great balance between looseness and exactness that is not conveyed well through this photograph.

Well, that’s all I have for today. Until next time, when I hope I have my pond painting finished.

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